We're Zhangjiajie local travel company, book Zhangjiajie tours with us, NO middlemen, NO hidden costs, SAVE the biggest!

Lusheng–National Intangible Cultural Heritage

Residents play Lusheng, a reed-pipe wind instrument, in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, southwest China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Aug. 16, 2012. Having a history of 2,000 years, Lusheng is a free-reed organ played by people of the Dong and Miao ethnic groups in southwest China. Performers often dance or swing the instrument from side to side while playing. In 2008, Lusheng was listed in the National Intangible Cultural Heritage List.

Yang Zhiguang makes Lusheng, a reed-pipe wind instrument, in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, southwest China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Aug. 16, 2012. Yang, 58, was born in Tongdao Dong Autonomous County of central China’s Hunan Province. He could play Lusheng when he was seven and began learning to make Lusheng at 20. Having a history of 2,000 years, Lusheng is a free-reed organ played by people of the Dong and Miao ethnic groups in southwest China. Performers often dance or swing the instrument from side to side while playing. In 2008, Lusheng was listed in the National Intangible Cultural Heritage List. Since most young people in the villages go out for work, the persons who can play and make Lusheng becomes less and less. “Dong villages can live without Luseng. As the inheritor, I can not let this craft lost,” said Yang Zhiguang. Su Dejun, 47, Yang’s junior fellow apprentice, was invited to Sanjiang to make Lusheng this time.

Yang Zhiguang (R) makes Lusheng, a reed-pipe wind instrument, in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, southwest China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Aug. 16, 2012. Yang, 58, was born in Tongdao Dong Autonomous County of central China’s Hunan Province. He could play Lusheng when he was seven and began learning to make Lusheng at 20. Having a history of 2,000 years, Lusheng is a free-reed organ played by people of the Dong and Miao ethnic groups in southwest China. Performers often dance or swing the instrument from side to side while playing. In 2008, Lusheng was listed in the National Intangible Cultural Heritage List. Since most young people in the villages go out for work, the persons who can play and make Lusheng becomes less and less. “Dong villages can live without Luseng. As the inheritor, I can not let this craft lost,” said Yang Zhiguang. Su Dejun, 47, Yang’s junior fellow apprentice, was invited to Sanjiang to make Lusheng this time.

Su Dejun makes Lusheng, a reed-pipe wind instrument, in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, southwest China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Aug. 16, 2012. Having a history of 2,000 years, Lusheng is a free-reed organ played by people of the Dong and Miao ethnic groups in southwest China. Performers often dance or swing the instrument from side to side while playing. In 2008, Lusheng was listed in the National Intangible Cultural Heritage List. Su Dejun, 47, was invited to Sanjiang to make Lusheng with his senior fellow apprentice Yang Zhiguang this time. (Xinhua/Bai Yu)

Yang Zhiguang makes Lusheng, a reed-pipe wind instrument, in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, southwest China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Aug. 16, 2012. Yang, 58, was born in Tongdao Dong Autonomous County of central China’s Hunan Province. He could play Lusheng when he was seven and began learning to make Lusheng at 20. Having a history of 2,000 years, Lusheng is a free-reed organ played by people of the Dong and Miao ethnic groups in southwest China. Performers often dance or swing the instrument from side to side while playing. In 2008, Lusheng was listed in the National Intangible Cultural Heritage List. Since most young people in the villages go out for work, the persons who can play and make Lusheng becomes less and less. “Dong villages can live without Luseng. As the inheritor, I can not let this craft lost,” said Yang Zhiguang. Su Dejun, 47, Yang’s junior fellow apprentice, was invited to Sanjiang to make Lusheng this time.

Source:Xinhua